ROUND-UP: What I’m reading and loving this morning

Today’s Sunday reading round-up is a mishmash of funny things. The demise of a Waffle House. Waddling trash can robots. The rise of the superstorm. The history of Little Red. Child labor on farms in America. Schizophrenia. Mary Cain, a high school track phenom. A dog climbing Mount Everest. Let’s go…

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Today’s Sunday reading round-up is a mishmash of funny things. The demise of a Waffle House. Waddling trash can robots. The rise of the superstorm. The history of Little Red. Child labor on farms in America. Schizophrenia. Mary Cain, a high school track phenom. A dog climbing Mount Everest. Let’s go…

If a cute, colorful trashcan waddled up to you and told you to pick up your trash, could you resist? Researchers at Japan’s Toyohashi University of Technology are betting you can’t. @ FastCo

On the last morning, before the waffle irons went cold and the pictures came down, before the lock refused to lock, before the claw crashed through the roof, the old man paced.@ Indiana Daily Student (P.S. – Read the comments, too)

Supertyphoon Haiyan slammed into the Philippines Friday. It was the worst storm of 2013 and possibly one of the worst in history—there are conflicting data so far from land-based and satellite wind-speed measurements. The Philippines and other parts of Southeast Asia are regularly battered by cyclones, as are the Caribbean and East Coast of North America. Why don’t these massive tropical storms hit the West Coast or Europe? @ Slate

We all know one fact about Little Red Riding Hood’s family tree: She has—or had—a grandmother. But newly published research suggests her ancestral linage in fact goes way, way back. @ Salon

The Nation has two tragic — and infuriating — investigative pieces about how young farmworkers (as young as 12) are left entirely unprotected by federal labor laws. Kids, writers Mariya Strauss and Gabriel Thompson found, are getting sick, injured and killed amid unsafe working conditions. @ Salon

Which illness frightens you most? Cancer? Stroke? Dementia? To judge from tabloid coverage, the condition we should really fear isn’t physical at all. “Scared of mum’s schizophrenic attacks”, “Knife-wielding schizophrenic woman in court”, “Schizo stranger killed dad”, “Rachel murder: schizo accused”, and “My schizophrenic son says he’ll kill… but he’s escaped from secure hospitals 7 times” are just a few of dozens of similar headlines we found in a cursory internet search. Mental illness, these stories imply, is dangerous. And schizophrenia is the most dangerous of all. @ The Guardian

Editors of a student newspaper are getting heat from school officials after banning the word “Redskins” — their mascot at Neshaminy, a high school named for the creek where the Lenape Indians once lived. @ Fox News

You’ve seen it happen. One day, you’re aspirationally browsing performance outerwear online; the next day, you’re seeing ads for Primaloft and Gore-Tex on every website you visit. That’s the power of tracking people while they’re shopping—even if they don’t buy anything—and brick-and-mortar stores want to get in on that action, too. They just need a way to record where their customers go, the way websites do. @ Popular Science

Mary Cain, the record-smashing runner from Bronxville High School, announced today that she plans to become a professional athlete under the continued coaching of legendary runner Alberto Salazar. @ Outside

Meet Rupee, he’s a former stray dog that just made history by becoming the very first dog in the world to climb Mount Everest! Found starving in a dump in Northern India, his owner, Joanna Lefson, decided to rescue him and nurse him back to health by feeding him a high protein diet that consisted of boiled eggs and rice. Slowly, he built back his strength and soon he was so strong he was able to climb mountains. Now, he’s the very first dog on record to climb Mount Everest, trekking side by side next to Lefson for 10 days to base camp, which is 17,000 feet above sea level. @ My Modern Met

No one does the fame thing like Clooney. He floats above it even as he uses it to embellish his influence. He understands his place in the pantheon even as he remains hidden from the inquisitive lens. He’s the master. @ Esquire

Phelps told The Associated Press on Thursday that “nothing is set in stone” though clearly he has enjoyed getting back into shape — he’s down about 15 pounds — and working out with his former team at the North Baltimore Aquatic Club. @ The Huffington Post

If you’ve got 10 minutes, you can learn the history of English — including some interesting background on where specific words and phrases came from. @ Boing Boing

Forget circumnavigating the globe in 80 days—an albatross can do it in a mere 46! These world travelers are among the largest flying birds, weighing up to 25 pounds (11 kilograms), and with a wingspan of 11 feet (3 meters). But hefting such huge bodies off the ground takes a lot of energy. If albatrosses flew simply by flapping their wings, they would lose about half their body mass fueling that kind of flight. @ National Geographic

For every buyer who is satisfied with an average, ordinary family sedan in subdued “greige” paint, there is a customer out there who wants something special in the car he or she drives. @ The Chicago Tribune

‘Til next time…B.

Author: Brittany Taylor

Brittany Taylor is the chick behind SeeBrittWrite, and she believes in the transformative power of stories. She uses words to turn businesses into story-driven brands. Her work has appeared in national magazines, both in print and digital, but her next project might just be yours.

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